The meaning of “Cho-le” in table tennis


Welcome to the channel of coach EmRatThich.
Today, I want to explain the meaning of
“Cho-le”, and how to “cho” correctly in table
tennis.
Why Chinese players cheer “Cho” after winning
the point?
Because they normally say “Hao Cho” (??) during
their training and match?
“Hao
Cho” means “good ball”.
But “Hao” is the weak sound with open mouth,
so in short,
they say “Cho” after winning a good ball.
And
what is “Cho-leeeeeey” ?
“le” (?) means “again, one more”.
So “Cho-le” is “good ball again”, “one more”.
“Cho-le!
Cho” is like “One more, good ball!”
And what is “Aller” ?
“Aller” is french.
“Aller” means “Come on”.
Many players use “Allez, Come on”.
For
example Ma Lin, he sometimes uses trilingual
“Cho-le!
Allez!
Come on!”.
And what is “sa” ?
Some people explains that “sa” is originated
from Chinese ? (sha) (to kill).
I don’t
think so, because this explication is too
aggresive.
If you play table tennis in France, you will
hear a lot of “ca”.
It’s “c’est �a”, means
“that’s it”, “like this”.
Timo Boll also uses a lot of “ca, c’est ca”.
So for me, “sa” is
“that’s it”, “yes, this ball!”.
So, to cheer in table tennis, we have:
– Cho (good ball)
– Cho-le (good ball, again)
– Allez (go, come on in French)
– Come on
– Ca (C’est ca) (yes! like this)
– Vamos (Portugese for come on)
– Chu (variation of Cho, only used by Ma Long)
– …….. and what elses?
How to “cho” correctly?
“Cho-ing” has become the tradition and the
culture in table tennis.
Scream �cho!�
is a means of self-encouragement and tension-relief.
But you should �Cho� only at the important
point.
Don’t “Cho” at every point,
because it’s rude and unnecessary, which can
cause you and your opponent to lose
the temper and the concentration.
Table tennis is the sport, but not the battle
of screaming.
Now, are you ready for
this “funny” 40 seconds screaming battle between
Lin Gaoyuan and Bernadette
Szocs?
Let’s rock!

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